Skip to content
April 20, 2012 / schulerbooks

Schuler Guest Author Spot: Marney K. Makridakis, Creating Time

This week’s guest author spot is definitely a good one for me – author Marney Makridakis shares some thoughts on “time anxiety,” based on her new book Creating Time: Using Creativity to Reinvent the Clock and Reclaim Your Life. Check it out and get more in the book!

No Time? Changing Time Anxiety to Time Artistry

By Marney Makridakis author of Creating Time

When I surveyed fifty-two people about their experiences with time, the results revealed that 90 percent felt “somewhat anxious” to “significantly anxious” about time. What’s even more startling is that these results don’t even seem all that surprising. Stress and worry about time is very much a part of most of our lives. Our modern society makes it acceptable and even expected that we fall into patterns of being worried and stressed about time. While worrying about time seems to be part of our humanity, does it really need to be? What kinds of payoffs are we getting from worrying about time?

It’s helpful to dig deeply to figure out what is at the root of our problems with time. Why do we overschedule ourselves? Why do we want to be so busy? Why are we so consumed with time? Why does it seem so “normal” to worry about time so much? Why is it easier to be caught up in a drama about time than it is to be released from it?

Here are some examples of payoffs that people might receive from worrying or complaining about time:

  • Time is a good catchall: if I can complain about being busy, then I don’t have to look at other areas in my life.
  • My schedule is wrapped up with my self-esteem. Being “too busy” means that I’m successful.
  • I don’t plan things that I might enjoy because it is too scary — it just feels safer to be bored.
  • Worrying about time gives me something to talk about with other people.
  • Worrying about time is a convenient excuse for not following my dreams.

Once we can identify the payoffs that we get from worrying about time, we can see them for what they are: illusions that keep us from living our true potential. Simply being aware of what we are getting from our time worries allows us to make a different choice: a choice to partner with time, instead of working against it.

We know that time is relative. Einstein proved it over a hundred years ago, and you prove it every time you compare an hour you spend in the dentist’s chair to an hour you spend with a loved one! Time is totally different in these two extremely different situations because of several variables at play, such as emotion, engagement, flow, desire, interest, pain, and pleasure. With so many variables dancing around in every single moment of our lives, we know that time is never constant. Since time is relative, we can use this to our advantage, and choose what our relationship with time will be. Every time we decide how we choose to talk about, measure, and experience time, we are creating a new era of time.

It’s time to finally drop all the archaic views and limitations of time that have held you back from fully embracing the wild beautiful truth: time is not a defined line; it is instead a vibrant, completely moldable, layered, multi-faceted work of art that is in your hands to create and design, each and every day.

 

Marney K. Makridakis is the author of Creating Time. She founded the Artella online community for creators of all kinds and the print magazine Artella. A popular speaker and workshop leader, she created the ARTbundance approach of self-discovery through art. She lives in Dallas, Texas. Visit her online at http://www.artellaland.com.

Based on the book Creating Time: Using Creativity to Reinvent the Clock and Reclaim Your Life ©2012 by Marney Makridakis.  Published with permission of New World Library http://www.newworldlibrary.com

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: